One Great Thing

For the average [non-diabetic] person diabetes is pretty simple, you just can’t have sugar right? Well, unfortunately (not only is that wrong) its just not that simple. In fact its far more complex than that. Someone who is diabetic experiences changes in blood glucose levels for more reasons than simply eating stuff with sugar in it. Along with food there is also sickness, stress, exercise, sports, insulin (and other treatments?) and as Rachel puts it, sugar monsters. Not to mention, sugar is a carbohydrate which makes that list of things to not over-indulge in a lot bigger.

Although I am new to all of this, the last few months has proven to me this is some serious friggin’ ish, diabetes is high maintenance! It’s a 24×7 job that requires you to get a self accredited degree in Physiology, Culinary Arts and Nutrition! Don’t even let me get started talking about keeping up with appointments and diabetic supplies.

But of course I’m not going to sit here and take all the credit for maintaining these last few months (and the years to come), my girlfriend since high school has been by my side every step of the way! She insists on knowing what its like to walk in my shoes and has changed every bit of her lifestyle including dramatically reducing some of the things we both love like pizza, pasta and soda. In fact that used to be dinner at least two to three times a week not too long ago! She ensures that I remember to replenish and bring my test kit and insulin with me in the mornings and when we go out. She constantly asks me, “Whats your blood sugar at?” or, “Did you check?” Its a lifesaver to have someone to remind you, especially if you are watching the game or out having fun as often as I am. During basketball games I have the luxury of having someone to prepare a test for me and remind me to test during half time. She dove into this with me with both feet, she once took one of my insulin pen needles and jammed it into her stomach just to see what it felt like! LOL!

If I had to pick one thing and highlight it, it would have to be the way she convinces me that everything is going to be just fine. No matter how much my numbers suck or how bad I want to eat an entire box of donuts but can’t, she seems to always know the right thing to say. She provides the one great thing that no one else in the world is in the position to provide and that’s constant support. What would I do without her?

 

Sometimes music says it better:

I’ll Be There” and “It Feels Good! (to know that you’ll always be there)”

 

I am participating in the third annual Diabetes Blog Week! I’ll be contributing by posting about pre-determined topics each day for a week. You can find more posts by going to the topic list and by searching Twitter hashtag #dblogweek.

15
May 2012
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POSTED IN DBlog Week 2012
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6 Responses to : One Great Thing

  1. Pingback: #dBlogWeek One Great Thing // RLASKEY::words

  2. Tina Conaty says:

    Wow! I have an amazing D Partner in my boyfriend too. It’s heartwarming to find someone else who is as lucky as I am. With all the crap that comes with D could you imagine going it alone? Not me. Give that lady a hug and never forget just how rare real support, the kind that comes free of judgement is.

  3. Brian says:

    I have no idea what I would do without my wife! She helps me keep things straight and we are the perfect team. It is awesome to have someone there for you!

  4. Sounds like she’s a keeper! One thing we can all do right is recognize the good fortune in our lives!

  5. Robin says:

    Drew, The first year is the worst…well, what do I know, I’m only the mom of a T1. But I think my daughter would tell you it does get better (and worse some days!). Your girlfriend is a blessing! Hang in there, the DOC is here to help!

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