Type 1 Diabetes Cure Possible?

I’m not sure how much this has been discussed in the type 1 diabetes community but i just bumped into an article that states the Boston Children’s Hospital has found the root cause of type 1 diabetes. I’ve read lots of articles that discuss leads on cures, but nothing this straight forward. In the article it says:

“The Boston Children’s Hospital could be on the verge of curing type 1 diabetes.”

That’s amazing! I’m glad that so much progress is being made on this front and definitely believe that one day we will be able to immunize children from ever having to deal with type 1 diabetes and free others from the burden it brings.

I’ll post an update on my condition soon, but in short I’m doing pretty awesome in comparison to this time one year ago.

17
Jun 2013
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JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes

For the first time I’ll be participating in the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabates! The walk is on Saturday, October 13, 2012 at the DCR Hatch Shell in Boston. Feel free to visit my team page (and donate if you can)! My goal is set to $500 but anything i raise will be beneficial to this cause! Feel free to join my team as well!

27
Sep 2012
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Diabetes Hero – Flora Allen-Hopson

Although I was diagnosed with diabetes a mere 4 1/2 months ago I’ve quickly learned so much about how important it is to maintain a good attitude as well as hope for positive changes in the future. Finding the right resources and meeting the right people are important factors in getting the proper education and inspiration needed to properly manage and endure the daily requirements of diabetes.

One person that has been a great inspiration to me has been Flora Allen-Hopson, the mother and biggest fan of Boston Celtics guard Ray Allen. Since the discovery of her grandson Walker’s type 1 diabetes at 17 months old, she has been dedicated to doing everything in her power to promote diabetes awareness and finding a cure. It was this that inspired her to run the Boston Marathon year after year in support of Walker on Team Joslin. The Boston Marathon is 26.2 miles long and takes some serious determination to get through, but that doesn’t scare Flo Allen-Hopson away. Whenever someone mentions how tough it is to make it through a marathon or asks her how she can endure the pain and fatigue of 26 miles she immediately returns their attention to the reason she is running. She reminds them that if her grandson cannot take a break from the pain of insulin shots and finger pricks that are required to manage diabetes then she won’t be taking a day off from running, “That’s greater than any pain I can feel on the 26.2-mile route.” I have had the opportunity to watch her cross the finish line in person, which has meant more to me this year than in years passed due to my now personal connection in her cause.

Flo, along with the help of her son Ray Allen and his wife Shannon Allen has successfully been able to raise money and awareness for diabetes through the Ray of Hope foundation and the Joslin Diabetes Center by managing various programs such as $3 for 3′s where participants donate $3 for every 3 pointer Ray Allen hits during a game.

She never forgets to mention that her hopes are for a cure. Her consistency and dedication to just that is inspiring to me, to continue to manage my own type 1 diabetes, help raise awareness, maintain a level of hope and to be active in the diabetes community. Both Flo and Walker Allen have been an inspiration to me.

 

Links:

Walker’s Diagnosis Story

Ray Allen Website

Ray of Hope Facebook Page

 

I am participating in the third annual Diabetes Blog Week! I’ll be contributing by posting about pre-determined topics each day for a week. You can find more posts by going to the topic list and by searching Twitter hashtag #dblogweek

20
May 2012
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What They Should Know

Today’s #dblogweek topic is to write about something you would want non-diabetics to know that they don’t already know about living with diabetes.

Although I have learned a lot about diabetes in the last 4 months, I know there’s more to learn and more to experience before I care what other people think or know about the d-life.  There are a few annoyances such as people not knowing the causes and distinctions between types. But that lack of understanding probably goes for every type of condition out there and I don’t expect anyone to know much about something that they aren’t forced to live with. Until recently I barely knew anything myself. Maybe next blog week I’ll feel differently!

 

I am participating in the third annual Diabetes Blog Week! I’ll be contributing by posting about pre-determined topics each day for a week. You can find more posts by going to the topic list and by searching Twitter hashtag #dblogweek.

18
May 2012
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Fantasy Diabetes Device

I’ve always been interested in the latest technologies and how soon I can get my hands on it. As soon as I found out about myself having diabetes I immediately began looking into the best devices out there to make this easier to deal with. I was already dreaming of fantasy devices and to my surprise, some of the devices I was imagining actually did exist. I remember thinking about how awesome it would be to know what your blood sugar is in real-time. I figured that was far into the future, until my exposure to the DOC quickly showed me that things are moving faster than I once thought!

I’m still very, very new to diabetes. Although I’m excited to be able to have a cool pump with some cutting edge abilities and a CGM (or both combined in one package?) I think I want to stay away from attached devices as long as possible since I know at some point I will have them and rely on them.

With that said I do have a fantasy device in mind that I would love to have today. Ever since I saw the movie Iron Man 2, I quickly took notice of a device he used in the movie that reminded me of a glucose testing device, but a lot simpler. In the movie, he was checking his blood toxicity instead of glucose. It was cool because there was no lancing device needed, just a quick press of the thumb and the results were virtually instant.

 

In my fantasy this device is instant and painless. I can use it as many times as I like with no risk for damage to my skin from multiple pricks and I can scroll through a menu that lets me check other things such as a1c, and LDL Cholesterol.

Hopefully I see this on the shelves soon!

I am participating in the third annual Diabetes Blog Week! I’ll be contributing by posting about pre-determined topics each day for a week. You can find more posts by going to the topic list and by searching Twitter hashtag #dblogweek.

17
May 2012
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Backup Your Dblog!

I’ve been in systems/IT for about 8 years now and the one thing I see constantly is the absence of a good backup system. This goes for desktops, laptops, servers and the websites that run on them. I’m not 100% sure why this is, maybe its a laziness, lack of technical ability or they just need to lose all of their data to realize they should have been backing it up. Are you backing up your blog? If not, today is your lucky day because I’m going to show you how. It seems like WordPress is the most popular blogging platform, so I’ll focus on that.

First off, if you haven’t heard of Dropbox you should stop everything you are doing right now and go setup an account. Dropbox is simply amazing, think of having a magic folder on your desktop that has the same thing in it no matter where you go, or which one of your devices you are using. Now imagine your WordPress blog using that magic folder as a backup location automatically. Wait.. did this just solve two issues? Yup, you can use this to keep up with files on your computer(s) instead of those pesky USB sticks you know you carry around and backup your dblog!

After you setup a Dropbox account just go to your WordPress Dashboard, hover over Plugins on the left and click “Add New”. Search for “WordPress Backup to Dropbox” and install the first result. If you are an advanced user, or this method fails you can try installing it a different way. Once installed your menu bar on the left will now have a “WPB2D” item, go into the “Backup Settings” and click authorize to connect WordPress to Dropbox!

It should look something like this:

The only settings I changed here were to backup daily at midnight, and set my database files to be stored in a folder called, “db-backup”. You should be all set now! Click Backup Now in the WPB2D menu and your WordPress files and database will backup into your Dropbox folder!

Now install Dropbox on every computer and device you own for added awesomeness! (not required)

Note:

If your WordPress blog is hosted by WordPress.com then this doesn’t apply to you. Your data is in the WordPress cloud and is fairly safe there, but that doesn’t help if you delete a post or something like that. I would suggest using the export feature built into their Dashboard to simply download the export file into.. wait, yes, download it to your Dropbox folder!

Problems?

Try using the installation instructions on the plugin page, or contact me for help. Do you run another blog platform but need help backing up? Let me know!

Questions? Ask away!

16
May 2012
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One Thing to Improve

Today’s #DBlog week topic is to look at something that I could do better. Although I haven’t been managing this long enough to develop too many bad habits, I can for certain say that I could improve my attitude about it.

I’m constantly looking at the dark side and fearing the future, trying to figure out how things will change for me before they do. Since early in the year my understanding of diabetes has changed over and over. Things I believed to be true at one point have been disproved and things I didn’t know, often positive things such as studies, technology and the DOC have come to light.

Hopefully with the new connections I’m making every day with events like Diabetes Blog Week I can greatly improve my attitude about living with diabetes. Even though this can be hard, and may get harder having a positive attitude can go a long way!

And a funny cat picture just because:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am participating in the third annual Diabetes Blog Week! I’ll be contributing by posting about pre-determined topics each day for a week. You can find more posts by going to the topic list and by searching Twitter hashtag #dblogweek.

16
May 2012
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One Great Thing

For the average [non-diabetic] person diabetes is pretty simple, you just can’t have sugar right? Well, unfortunately (not only is that wrong) its just not that simple. In fact its far more complex than that. Someone who is diabetic experiences changes in blood glucose levels for more reasons than simply eating stuff with sugar in it. Along with food there is also sickness, stress, exercise, sports, insulin (and other treatments?) and as Rachel puts it, sugar monsters. Not to mention, sugar is a carbohydrate which makes that list of things to not over-indulge in a lot bigger.

Although I am new to all of this, the last few months has proven to me this is some serious friggin’ ish, diabetes is high maintenance! It’s a 24×7 job that requires you to get a self accredited degree in Physiology, Culinary Arts and Nutrition! Don’t even let me get started talking about keeping up with appointments and diabetic supplies.

But of course I’m not going to sit here and take all the credit for maintaining these last few months (and the years to come), my girlfriend since high school has been by my side every step of the way! She insists on knowing what its like to walk in my shoes and has changed every bit of her lifestyle including dramatically reducing some of the things we both love like pizza, pasta and soda. In fact that used to be dinner at least two to three times a week not too long ago! She ensures that I remember to replenish and bring my test kit and insulin with me in the mornings and when we go out. She constantly asks me, “Whats your blood sugar at?” or, “Did you check?” Its a lifesaver to have someone to remind you, especially if you are watching the game or out having fun as often as I am. During basketball games I have the luxury of having someone to prepare a test for me and remind me to test during half time. She dove into this with me with both feet, she once took one of my insulin pen needles and jammed it into her stomach just to see what it felt like! LOL!

If I had to pick one thing and highlight it, it would have to be the way she convinces me that everything is going to be just fine. No matter how much my numbers suck or how bad I want to eat an entire box of donuts but can’t, she seems to always know the right thing to say. She provides the one great thing that no one else in the world is in the position to provide and that’s constant support. What would I do without her?

 

Sometimes music says it better:

I’ll Be There” and “It Feels Good! (to know that you’ll always be there)”

 

I am participating in the third annual Diabetes Blog Week! I’ll be contributing by posting about pre-determined topics each day for a week. You can find more posts by going to the topic list and by searching Twitter hashtag #dblogweek.

15
May 2012
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Finding a Friend

In January of this year when I was told I was diabetic all I could do was run to Google and search for answers to the hundreds of questions I had. This is probably the worst thing to do for someone newly diagnosed because the majority of results are geared towards reminding you over and over what complications are associated with diabetes. Searching for and finding something positive was just about impossible, the results were always lifeless and depressing. I tried my best to stop searching for answers on the internet, but that just wasn’t going to happen. I spend nearly 10 hours a day in front of a computer and always have at least two devices to fall back on when I’m not.

I bumped into a few blogs, but even they were talking about how bad of a day they were having and I didn’t stick around to read anymore. Finally I bumped into a blog that seemed to have some life! It was One Third of a Muffin.

The layout was clean with vibrant colors, there was awesome imagery and a variety of diabetes and non-diabetes related topics. I thought wow, this blogger seems to have a positive attitude about diabetes, this I can read! It was just what I needed at the time, so of course I hurried on over to the about page to learn more about Rachel. The first thing I noticed was that after being a diabetic most of her life she still turned to the online community to find and meet other diabetics like herself. This was the first time I felt like I wasn’t the only one out there, and maybe things will get better for me after all! Not only did she mention that she uses the Joslin Diabetes Center that’s located right in my neighborhood, but she mentioned the One Touch Ping system which was something I already had my eye on. I was hooked and for the next few days spent my time hitting up this blog to catch up on posts, and to my delight new posts were showing up frequently!

Here are a couple of my favorite posts:

Diabetic Sighting

Something I have yet to do, but can imagine this giving me some fuzzy feelings!

I Kicked the Wedding’s Butt

This made me realize that i can use my competitive side a little better in my management!

Since January I have been less than happy with the lack of humanity found online and in the medical field when it comes to diabetes education, especially relating to modern treatment, nutrition and the distinction between type 1 and type II.  I pondered the idea of blogging about my experiences early on, to possibly help newly diagnosed diabetics get through the initial confusion and misguidance. This blog helped kick that off for me.

Please, head on over to Onethirdofamuffin.com and follow @onethirdmuffin on twitter!

 

I am participating in the third annual Diabetes Blog Week! I’ll be contributing by posting about pre-determined topics each day for a week. You can find more posts by going to the topic list and by searching Twitter hashtag #dblogweek.

14
May 2012
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Sports and Blood Sugar, WTF?

Over the past few months I’ve been getting the hang of managing my blood sugar levels, learning different techniques and having a good idea of what number I’m about to see before I see it. Since I eliminated day / mealtime insulin its become even easier. The only thing I’ve been having trouble with is managing and understanding my blood sugar level during sports, particularly basketball.

The first time I played basketball with diabetes  (4 months ago) I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. I think I ate and took insulin at the same time, had some Gatorade and hoped for the best. As you would guess that didn’t work out.

After realizing that mixing all of that together would make it impossible to develop a strategy, I then switched to reducing insulin use before games with the hope of getting up to around 150 and gradually burning out all that glucose during the game and finishing up in the normal (80-120) range. My biggest fear at this time was going low, so this was a start high, end low type of strategy. This worked a couple of times, but it wasn’t easy to get my blood sugar that high without over and under shooting my target range.

My newest strategy since cutting back on insulin is to leave a 1.5 to 2 hour gap between any “blood sugar changing” activities such as eating, using insulin and stress. The idea here was that during sports, the less things that have an effect on my blood sugar the better. This actually worked out for a while but after playing more intensely for longer periods of time I began to start going high during games. I start out at 90 and end up at 180-190 roughly 25 minutes into the game. I’m not sure if it is caused by adrenaline or the physical demand. Either way, its a reminder that I’m diabetic and pretty dam annoying.

Here’s the part I REALLY don’t understand. Immediately after playing I could be at 190, and a re-test with the same meter 2 seconds later and get something ~40 points lower. Around 30 minutes later I’m right back in the normal range without the use of insulin. Is it normal to get seemingly random results during physical activity? If my blood sugar level is changing so rapidly, how do I go about treating it? Any suggestions are welcome!

 

09
May 2012
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